Analytical Writing About Film

 

Students in Analytical Writing About Film will view a variety of selected films dating from the 1940’s to the present. Students will learn to analyze film content and style, and to assess their effects on audiences and society at large for their impact on culture and society. The course will also explore connections between literature and film.

Students will practice analytical and critical writing in this course, which will promote multiple literacies of cinematic narrative, characterization, setting and language. Students would need to be able to access films either through the internet, rental, or their local libraries. Film choices may include, but are not limited to: Casablanca; Psycho; The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly; Cool Hand Luke; The Godfather; One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest; Star Wars; The Breakfast Club; My Left Foot; Life is Beautiful; Chicago; Glory Road; Million Dollar Baby; and The King’s Speech.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

AP English Literature and Composition

 

Using the theme of food critic, this senior-level course covers works of merit from the British and American canon. The selection of literature ranges from poetry and fiction to drama. Students will focus on developing strong writing and literary analysis skills.

For a year, participate in an AP upscale dining experience in the AP Literature and Composition course. Students act as food critics of exquisite literary cuisine. Menu items include reading, analyzing, writing, rewriting, and discussing creations by the master chefs, renowned authors. With intensive concentration on composition skills and on authors’ narrative techniques, this dining experience equips students with recipes for success in college, in a career and the AP exam.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 1 credit
Advanced Placement

The Beatles and Literature

 

“Does art shape culture, or does culture shape art?” That is one of the eternal questions in philosophy and art, and also a question that can easily be asked about the 1960’s, especially when thinking about the biggest celebrities of that decade: The Beatles. While studying the highs and lows of the 1960’s and The Beatles, you will have a chance to explore some of the literary works that inspired, or were inspired by, the music and message of The Beatles, while also contemplating some of the most powerful songs of the last 50 years.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Creative Writing

 

Marianne Moore once described poetry as the ability to create “imaginary gardens with real toads in them” and Edgar Allen Poe viewed short stories as the best possible work in prose (for Poe poetry was the truest literary art). If you would like to create gardens or learn more about writing a short story then this is the course for you. By performing a series of activities and projects designed to stimulate the creative process, each student will explore a variety of forms, including fiction, expository prose, and poetry, with the objective to encourage the development of the writer’s authentic voice and style. Selected readings, including models and critical guides, will support the course’s writing activities. Ultimately students will create an electronic portfolio that reflects their development as a writer.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

English I

 

In English I, students take a journey through important concepts–the Unknown, Equality, Identity, Opportunity, and Understanding–to learn the foundations of communication and analysis. In each unit of the course, students explore a variety of STEM-related literature, including genre fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and speeches. Through the study of this writing, students hone their own skills in communication and analysis.

To facilitate engagement and academic responsibility, students are encouraged to make choices at different points in the course. Most notable is the novel unit, in which students must select their book from a list of titles available. This practice gives ownership to the student and places each learner in a position to develop a deeper appreciation of reading.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5/Segment 1, 0.5/Segment 2
Honors Credit Available
NCAA Approved

English II

 

In English II, students learn how the human experience—real life—is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, students explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as laughter, obstacles, betrayal, fear, or transformation. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, students explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed.

As in life, students have many choices in the English II course. They choose the order in which they complete the units. Students also choose some of the works they read and have countless choices when it comes to demonstrating what they have learned. Whether reading a poem or a novel, writing a story or an analysis, or studying a Shakespearean tragedy or a modern suspense film, students explore what it means to be human, a subject on which they are already experts!

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5/Segment 1, 0.5/Segment 2
Honors Credit Available
NCAA Approved

Foundations of American Literature

 

(Segment 1 of English III) “Extra, extra, read all about it!” It’s all right here in black and white, in the pages of The Virtual Times newspaper. Published at key periods in American history, The Virtual Times takes us right into the action. The writing is clear and concise. The stories and opinions give us perspective. The sports and entertainment sections give us the color and flavor of the times.

In English III, the writing and insights of authors throughout our history are collected in the fast-paced pages of The Virtual Times. Students gain an appreciation of American literature and the ways it reflects the times in which it was written. They discover how people thought and lived and wrote about their experiences. Students are also asked to observe, investigate, and report on stories of today. The goal is for students to be thorough, accurate, and compelling in their writing.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Honors Credit Available

Gothic Literature

 

From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Journalism

 

If you’re the first to know what’s going on in your school or town, or the first to post on Facebook or Instagram about your favorite TV shows or favorite celebrities, then you’re just the person that every online, in-print, and broadcast news outlet is looking for. And Journalism: Investigating the Truth is the perfect course for you! In this course, you’ll learn how to write a lead that grabs your readers, how to write engaging news stories and features, and how to interview sources. You’ll also learn about the history of journalism, how to succeed in the world of social media news, and how to turn your writing, photography, and people skills into an exciting and rewarding career.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

The Literature and Language of Rulers

 

(Segment 1 of English IV) Students explore the world of big ideas in English IV, where they choose which path they will travel first while exploring highly engaging thematic units. Each path guides students through a series of literary pieces, allowing students to analyze the political, social, economic, and cultural messages of the time as well as the relevance of the literary works to the world students live in today. Each path revolves around a central theme.

The works in the course span a period of over 1000 years and have been written by authors who share common ideas but use a variety of literary genres to express their views. Whether it is the dramatic ending of a play or the colorful images in a verse of poetry, the words of these authors give students a new understanding of the world around them. As students travel down each path, they create authentic pieces that engage them in higher-level learning and provide them with a greater understanding of literature and its connection to the world.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Honors Credit Available

The Lord of the Rings

 

The Lord of the Rings is one of the most popular stories in the modern world. In this course, you will study the movie versions of J.R.R. Tolkein’s novel and learn about the process of converting literature to film. You will explore fantasy literature as a genre and critique the three Lord of the Rings films.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

 

Mythology and Folklore

 

Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Mythology and folklore have been used since the first people gathered around the fire as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. This course focuses on the many myths and legends woven into cultures around the world. Starting with an overview of mythology and the many kinds of folklore, the student will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit the gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle and watch as clever animals outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how they are still used to shape society today.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Poetry in American Literature

 

(Segment 2 of English III) “Extra, extra, read all about it!” It’s all right here in black and white, in the pages of The Virtual Times newspaper. Published at key periods in American history, The Virtual Times takes us right into the action. The writing is clear and concise. The stories and opinions give us perspective. The sports and entertainment sections give us the color and flavor of the times.

In English III, the writing and insights of authors throughout our history are collected in the fast-paced pages of The Virtual Times. Students gain an appreciation of American literature and the ways it reflects the times in which it was written. They discover how people thought and lived and wrote about their experiences. Students are also asked to observe, investigate, and report on stories of today. The goal is for students to be thorough, accurate, and compelling in their writing.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Honors Credit Available

Public Speaking

 

The art of public speaking is one which underpins the very foundations of Western society. This course examines those foundations in both Aristotle and Cicero’s views of rhetoric, and then traces those foundations into the modern world. Students will learn not just the theory, but also the practice of effective public speaking, including how to analyze the speeches of others, build a strong argument, and speak with confidence and flair. By the end of this course, students will know exactly what makes a truly successful speech and will be able to put that knowledge to practical use.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Images courtesy of FLVS Global & eDynamics

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