African-American History

 

How have African Americans shaped the culture of the United States throughout history? Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans from the slave trade through emancipation, and to the modern African diaspora, you will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In African American History, you’ll come face to face with individuals who changed the course of history and learn more about slavery, racism, and the Civil Rights Movement. You will also explore how the history of African Americans influences current events today.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

American History

 

The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War through today.

Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course also gives students the opportunity to conduct research and apply their learning to current, real-world problems.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5/Segment 1, 0.5/Segment 2
Honors Credit Available
NCAA Approved

AP Macroeconomics

 

The objectives of this course will be to engage students in real world application of the economic concepts that they will be tested on when taking the Advanced Placement exam provided by the College Board. 

The course motif is The Macro Islands. The students take on the role of economic advisor to the president of a group of islands. The pictures and passages relate to things found in the sea or on an island. By examining the economy of the island, students can draw parallels to our own economy.

“Mr. Scarcity” will be the students guide as they learn about the economic situation of the islands. Students will be learning all they can about macroeconomics in preparation for the AP Exam. Mr. Scarcity will ask students to complete assignments showing that they understand the information.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Advanced Placement
NCAA Approved

AP Microeconomics

 

You traveled to the Macro Islands to assist the leader in winning re-election. You came for a job, but you realized as you were working that you loved the islands and wanted to make your home there. Because you are adept at giving economic advice to the leader, you have been appointed as the new President of the Sunny Seas Shell Company.

As part of your role in assuming the leadership duties of the company, you will need to brush up on microeconomics. The Board of Directors has appointed Ms. Equilibrium to act as your personal assistant and advisor as you transition into your new role. You will be learning all you can about microeconomics and will be required to exhibit your knowledge in May at the annual Board of Directors’ meeting (the AP Exam).

 

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Advanced Placement
NCAA Approved

AP United States Government and Politics

 

Within AP U.S. Government and Politics, students develop and use disciplinary practices and reasoning processes to explore political concepts, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students examine core principles, theories, and processes through direct study of U.S. foundational documents and Supreme Court opinions. They also participate in a civic project in which they research, study, and compile data on a political science topic and create a presentation that exhibits their findings and experiences.

The AP U.S. Government and Politics course is structured around five big ideas outlined within the College Board Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics Course Framework. Each big idea is aligned to enduring understanding statements and learning objectives that focus on key concepts and essential knowledge about foundations of American democracy, civil liberties and civil rights, interactions among branches of government, American political participation, ideologies, and beliefs.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Advanced Placement
NCAA Approved

AP Psychology

 

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They will also learn about ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. A goal of this course is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses, in addition to preparing students for the AP Exam.

In this course, students will be expected to understand objective, empirical methods of collecting and interpreting data, make meaningful interconnection between disparate concepts and analyze, evaluate and critique thematic perspectives. Content will include, but not be limited to, methods, biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing for intelligence and personality, abnormal psychology, treatment of disorders, and social psychology. Course outline will adhere to the guidelines of the College Board.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 1 credit
Advanced Placement
NCAA Approved

Archaeology

 

George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” The field of archaeology helps us to better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape our modern world. This course focuses on this techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students will learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artefacts are located and preserved. Finally, students will learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Civics

 

Learning about civics gives students the skills and knowledge necessary to be active citizens who have a positive impact on their communities. In this course, students discover the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States. They learn about the structure of the government and how it works at the local, state, and federal levels. This course examines elections, the lawmaking process, and how citizens can impact public policy. Students also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world. Geography and economics support the learning of civics in this course. Engaging in this study prepares students to be informed citizens who are ready to participate in the American democracy!

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5/Segment 1, 0.5/Segment 2

Economics

 

Economic decisions affect us every day of our lives. Understanding economics means thinking about how scarcity, or limited resources, requires us to make choices and evaluate one option against others. In this course, you will recognize examples of economics in your daily life. You will see how the economic choices of larger groups, like businesses and governments, affect you and others. As you progress through the course, you will recognize that the costs and benefits of choices connect individuals and groups around the world. The purpose of this course is to help you become a smart consumer who understands the flow of an economy between individuals, businesses, governments, and the rest of the world.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
Honors Available
NCAA Approved

History of the Holocaust

 

Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multi-disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students will gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and they will get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.

**Please be advised that the content of this course can be graphic and may be disturbing to some students.**

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5/Segment 1, 0.5/Segment 2

Human Geography

 

How do language, religion, and landscape affect the physical environment? How do geography, weather, and location affect customs and lifestyle? Students will explore the diverse ways in which people affect the world around them and how they are affected by their surroundings. Students will discover how ideas spread and cultures form, and learn how beliefs and architecture are part of a larger culture complex. In addition to introducing students to the field of Human Geography, this course will teach students how to analyze humans and their environments.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Introduction to Anthropology

 

The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present, future and address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in the course.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Introduction to Sociology

 

The world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values and behavior affect the people around you and the world we live in? In this increasingly connected world, students will examine problems in our society and learn how human relationships can influence the life of the student. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world are also presented in the course.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Introduction to Women’s Studies

 

This course, although looking specifically at the experiences of women, is not for girls only. If you are student interested in exploring the world through film and open minded enough to be interested in social change, this course is for you.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit

Psychology

 

What do you feel? How do you behave? What are your thoughts? Feelings, actions and thoughts are closely related and in this Psychology course, you will see how! 

Do you wonder things like why you learn the way you do, how you forget, and what makes you remember?  Are you curious about mental disorders and what traditional and non-traditional therapy is all about?  If experiments and role plays and dream interpretations sound interesting, then this is the class for you! 

In this course you will learn more about yourself and others including how to break a habit and how to cope with stress. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the subfields within psychology.

Enrollment Type: Traditional, On Demand
Credit: 0.5 credit
NCAA Approved

World History

 

Join modern time travelers Ali and Soo-jin as they journey through World History and help students discover how world events and eras are connected.

In Segment 1, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of the Islamic Empires. Journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. You will also investigate the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Hang on tight before you dive into the Age of Discovery, when eastern and western hemispheric encounters created some turbulent times.

Segment 2 begins with a bang as students learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment, as well as the social and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars that were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today.

Enrollment Type: On Demand
Credit: 0.5/Segment 1, 0.5/Segment 2
Honors Credit Available

 

Images courtesy of FLVS Global & eDynamics

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